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I called him Dad...

Dad never owned an automobile. He never learned to drive one after the Model T. We lived in a small town and could walk wherever we needed to go--to work, to shop, to school, to church.

When the depression hit he was laid off from the bank where he worked and for seven years never had steady employment. He was physically unable to do manual labor and it is still a mystery to me how he and mother were able to feed and clothe three children until we were able to make it on our own. Mother said one of the happiest days of Dad’s life was when he paid off the last hundred dollars charged at a grocery store. To his apology for being in debt so long the owner said, “I wasn't worried, J. R. I knew you were good for it”.

Times like that brought out the best (or worst) in people. Dad never blamed anyone for losing his job or envied anyone who could have been laid off rather than him. He searched everywhere for work but found only a few odd jobs. He tried delinquent account collecting and selling life insurance but everyone was as broke as he was.

Dad ran for election as County Clerk but lost by seven votes. It would have been six but Granddad lost his vote because he didn’t know how to split his ballot from a straight party vote. His friends said he lost because he refused to say anything bad about the incumbent.

Through all these desperate times Dad never lost his mild mannered, honest, straightforward ways. He took us to Sunday School and church every Sunday. The nearest I ever heard him curse was when he said, “By doggies”. What better example could I have?

After I (the youngest) was in college, Dad again became a full time employee at a bank and later became Cashier. Bank Directors there asked him for financial advice! Merchants would trust him with their Saturday receipts until the bank opened on Monday morning (no night depository). He kept more than one merchant solvent by holding checks which came in on Friday until they could be covered by Saturday’s sales.

When Mr. J. C. Penney was looking after his farms in the area he occasionally attended the Sunday school class where Dad was secretary. Dad was asked what he said to Mr. Penney when he came. “I stuck out the attendance card toward him--like I do everyone--and said, `Put your nickel right there’ “ was his reply.

V. L. Scott

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Comments (1)

Angela McClain:

Being raised in the "Scott Household" I am blessed to have been constantly mentored by the positive characteristics mentioned below.

"Times like that brought out the best (or worst) in people. Dad never blamed anyone for losing his job or envied anyone who could have been laid off rather than him."

"Through all these desperate times Dad never lost his mild mannered, honest, straightforward ways. He took us to Sunday School and church every Sunday. The nearest I ever heard him curse was when he said, “By doggies”. What better example could I have?"

My great grandfather's forward-looking attitude about life has been transferred down the line and is present today in each of my grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. This goes to show that living a life of sound integrity does translate generation to generation.

My great grandfather was a remarkable man. My grandfather, Vincent Scott, possesses every one of these desirable characteristics and more. He and my grandmother have taught me so much about life and how to live it well. Being extraordinary mentors they have impacted my path and life choices. I would not be the person I am today without their guidence. Grandma and Grandpa Scott have deeply touched me and continue to do so each day.

It is wonderful to be a part of a family that loves to laugh, finds the best in life, are hard working successful individuals and strive to love others as themselves.

We are blessed.

angie

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on January 4, 2007 11:06 PM.

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